June 14, 2013

Why Practice? Part Two

Posted in freewriting, Practice Writing, writing techniques tagged , , , , at 4:26 pm by Rebecca Hein

In all my years of playing concerts, recitals, and even wedding receptions, my most memorable encounters with the audience have occurred after the performance.

“I wish I had your talent,” someone always sighs while shaking my hand. “I don’t know how you make it look so easy.”

I do. Years and years of persistent work. Yet in the minds of these wistful people, there was no mechanism. There was no daily battle to play better in tune, to feel the sway of the beat, or to achieve beautiful tone. Instead, there was a vague idea: “talent.”

The mechanics of practice are the most important component of your writing. That means daily writing, for practice only. Not for brilliance, not to polish a draft, just to put words on paper.

You want to dazzle readers, and especially editors and agents, with the mastery of your craft. So don’t handicap yourself by neglecting practice. If you do, it’ll take you just that much longer to reach your goals.

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May 18, 2013

Why Practice? Part One

Posted in freewriting, Practice Writing, writing techniques tagged , , , , at 2:06 pm by Rebecca Hein

Is there a difference between freewriting and writing purely for practice? The former is something writers are exhorted to do, and the latter less frequently mentioned.

In freewriting you’re supposed to write whatever enters your head without editing or criticizing. Usually it’s for a set time. But why do it?

This question takes on meaning when we transfer the spirit of freewriting into the realm of practice writing. Why practice?

A simple question, with what should be an obvious answer, yet in several decades of cello playing, I’ve discovered that practicing is a vague concept in the minds of many people; without significance or value. If you’re a writer, and have this concept, it can be detrimental to your work.

June 13, 2012

Perfect Moments, Part Two

Posted in Creativity, freewriting, Peak Experiences, writing techniques tagged , , , , at 4:43 pm by Rebecca Hein

If our best work feels like a gift from above and therefore not something we can just grab, how do we achieve it? What I’ve learned from cello playing has taught me the answer.

In a series of wonderful, serendipitous practice sessions, I expected nothing. Making no attempt to recapture the best achievements of the previous day, I simply launched into my warm-ups and the beautiful, easy folk songs that deliver pure enjoyment.

For writers this is part of the answer. Give yourself time for fun, easy writing. Too many hours spent struggling with plot, character, or scene will bog you down.

Instead, on a daily basis, write letters to yourself. Or rant about your frustrations. Anything to get the words moving, after which you can expect things to begin to sparkle.

May 2, 2012

Total Absorption

Posted in Creativity, Flow, flow in writing, freewriting, Peak Experiences, writing techniques tagged , , , , at 2:01 pm by Rebecca Hein

When technique and tools disappear, leaving only our work in full flow, our consciousness is altered and we carry the wonder of that experience for days. The problem is that in wishing for a recurrence, we’ll skew it just by trying for it.

If instead we cultivate a state of attentive waiting, we’ll predispose ourselves to more such moments, yet without forcing. In music, attentive waiting can occur anytime you’re playing, and when you let go of everything except that alert, open state of mind.

In writing, especially freewriting, the same applies. Forget trying to write a story, scene, or essay. Forget not trying to write it. Start writing and see what happens, and don’t be surprised when you find that you’ve forgotten everything but the energy of the moment.

April 11, 2012

Freewriting, Part Five: Don’t Underrate It

Posted in flow in writing, freewriting tagged at 4:16 am by Rebecca Hein

While your freewriting is producing nothing but near-gibberish, causing you to wonder why you’re doing it, consider this: how often do you get perfect flow in a writing session? Perfect flow in freewriting is like a perfect warmup in music.

Before you know it, you’re launched and have been drawn into your sound. Playing a few easy notes or simple pieces, you become absorbed in the sensations of playing, and though these easy notes and pieces will never be heard in performance, they relax you and help you play your best.

Freewriting is the same. Launch it and keep going, forgetting about whether or not it will be readable. Then you’ll find that next time you try to write a story, essay, or poem, it will be much easier.

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